Saturday, June 13, 2015

Farm Machinery Question...

Tractor and discbines

I don't often post on Saturdays, but as I started to reply to a question asked about the farm machinery, it was taking up entirely too much space in the comments section. I decided to put this into a separate post, in case anyone else is interested.

So, in the comment's section of Wednesday's post, Nancy wrote,  "This former farmgirl is curious about the apparatus on the front of the tractor. It doesn't look like a loader. Do you have any idea what it is?" After discussing it with Mr. C., who seems to be an veritable encyclopedia of knowledge of all things related to farm machinery, I have the following information to add:

The apparatus on the front of the tractor is a discbine. There are three of those - one on the front and two others, one on each side. I had thought that it was a 'just' a mower and that the other thing was a crusher. When I said that to Mr. C., he responded, 'Pffft, that is SO yesterday!'  Okay, fine. So... the three things you see mounted to the tractor are called discbines. They cut and condition (fracture the stems so that they will dry faster) the hay in one operation. The tractor with attached discbines prices out at about $250,000.  Got some spare change??  They can cut about 40-50 acres an hour with that, and on a big field that doesn't have as many turnarounds, even more than that. It's GPS guided to discbine the field as efficiently and quickly as possible.

But we're not done yet. There are also the mergers and the self-propelled choppers.

 Merger

The merger gathers the dried hay from a 50 foot area and puts it into windrows for chopping.
 Self-propelled chopper

Now that the merger has put the hay in windrows, the self-propelled chopper comes along and chops it and blows it into the truck running alongside. When that truck is full, the next one is ready to take its place.  They will fill one of those trucks in about 4 or 5 minutes.

Incredible world of farm machinery we live in.
 
And now I have to include the cartoon that I'd put in a previous post about harvesting the alfalfa:

 Might this be a less expensive option?




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20 comments:

Terri D said...

Man oh man, the times have changed!! I was little when my grandparents still lived on their farm, but I just remember the tractor and the tiller (disks pulled by a tractor to prepare for planting). I am not a country girl and haven't been on a farm in years and years. No wonder the small family farms are gone. What a shame.

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

Wow, Judy, I don't know how farmers can afford such expensive equipment--That machine would certainly be very valuble in getting the job done.
Love the cartoon! ♥

TexWisGirl said...

big bucks in that equipment these days, for sure!

Sandra said...

who knew they had futuristic farm machinery... of COURSE it has GPS... that made me LOL really loud. our world it is a changing...

Tired Teacher said...

Ahhh, thanks to you and Mr. C for the explanation. My brother used a windrower (also called a swather) that does the job of both the discbine and merger and was self-propelled. Nearly all the farmers in this area use windrowers to cut their alfalfa. Under the unit is a crimper that is removed when cutting oats or barley.

Farm equipment is terribly expensive. I don't think many people realize that.

Linda Kay said...

After spending some time with my little brother on the farm in Illinois, I can relate to the cost of all that machinery.

podso said...

ha ha cute cartoon.

Rose said...

I so love that cartoon...I think I have seen it before but had totally forgot it.

I would not have know what the machinery was. Sometimes I really don't see how farmers make a living. Just their gas bill alone--or do they use diesel? Whichever, I hate to think what it costs, what the seeds cost, what the machinery costs. I bet people would be surprised!

Judith @ Lavender Cottage said...

I knew the big machinery was expensive as one of the gals here explained their cost and that a number of farmers in our area will go in together to buy one. It's not uncommon to see a huge whatever crossing a road or driving down to the next farm. It must cost a fortune to repair these monstrosities and keep them in fuel.
An interesting post Judy, thank Mr. C for his part.

Maureen @ Josephina Ballerina said...

Far side cartoon is how it is really done at night when no none is looking. Just ask Muker!

Cheryl said...

Interesting! I showed the picture to my husband (who grew up on a sort-of farm) and he thought that it was a mower. So we've both learned something tonight!

We both got a chuckle from the cartoon too! :D

Vee said...

So I'm reading this to John, a farmboy from way long time ago, and he was interested in the changes that have taken place. (He's pretty yesterday, too.) We get to the cartoon when I say, "I have to show you this cartoon." He says...

No, I better take this backstage. LOL!

eileeninmd said...

Good morning, the equipment does cost some bucks! I love the cute cartoon with the cow. Have a happy day and week ahead!

Lynne said...

Expensive equipment indeed . . .
Farming is not a "small potatoes" business . . .
If you are in it . . . you are IN IT!

Michelle F said...

Judy,

Such an informative post. I will pass it on.


xoxo

Lowcarb team member said...

I do like the cartoon you've included.

All the best Jan

Missy George said...

Thanks for the education and the laugh !!Have a happy week..

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

No wonder some farmers use roving crews for harvest.... That's a big cash outlay. The little church in your post above is so sweet and old fashioned. Nice to know they still exist.

Carla from The River said...

LOL, that is so yesterday! That Mr. C, he is so fun.
Thank you for keeping us posted on the farm machinery. It is true it has changed so much! In fact my dad no longer keeps up with it. He has a crew come and bale for him.
Carla

~Lavender Dreamer~ said...

What an interesting post. I love seeing the machinery work. We've stopped in our travels to watch them harvest cotton and that's neat. Love that cute cartoon, too! Enjoy your day. Hugs, Diane

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